Have You Ever Googled These Keywords? Don’t. . .

The internet is great for a lot of things like checking the news and weather, sending and receiving emails, performing financial transactions and shopping. One of the many gifts the internet age has brought us is the marvelous Google search engine. What would we possibly do without Google today? How would we search random facts, articles, and images? There’s no doubt that Google has become a necessity in the 21st century.

It’s no secret that the internet has a dark and scary side. You can come across search results for bunnies and rainbows just as easily as you can find images of gory crime scenes. Adults sometimes choose to put parental controls on search engines to shelter their kids from the scary side of the internet. But, the truth is no one is really immune to stumbling across inappropriate and disturbing Google searches these days.

The internet is tricky. Searching what may seem like an innocent word can have you a few clicks away from images that make you want to rip your eyeballs out. That’s exactly what this list is dedicated to, seemingly innocent keywords you never want to be caught Googling. If you ever hear the terms “Goatse” or “Meatspin” and are curious to see what they are, please wait until you’re in the privacy of your own home to Google search them. You’ll thank me.

#1 Cake Farts

It is the acts of getting naked and farting on a cake. to be a true cake fart the asshole must come in contact with the frosting. The Cake Fart fetish is an actual thing and so Googling these seemingly innocent words could lead you into some nasty territory.The end. There’s no need to Google “Cake Farts”, so for your own good, don’t.

#2 Blue Waffle

It’s not the name of any recipe, beware the “Blue Waffle”! Blue waffle is a fictitious sexually transmitted disease said to affect only women, causing severe infection and blue discoloration to the vagina.Images of the Blue Waffle started making their rounds on the internet in 2010. The disease has been confirmed as false.

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